The second volume for Clarkesworld Year Nine

NOW AVAILABLE!

Clarkesworld: Year Nine, Volume Two

Wyrm Publishing, July 1, 2018
ISBN: 978-1-64236-002-8 (trade paperback)
ISBN: 978-1-64236-001-1 (ebook)

Since 2006, Clarkesworld Magazine has been entertaining science fiction and fantasy fans with their brand of unique science fiction and fantasy stories. Collected here are all of the stories this Hugo Award-winning magazine published during the second half of their ninth year. Includes stories by Emily Devenport, Matthew Kressel, Yoon Ha Lee, Sam J. Miller, Robert Reed, Martin L. Shoemaker, Han Song, and many more!

CONTENTS

Introduction by Neil Clarke
The Empress in Her Glory by Robert Reed
Postcards From Monster Island by Emily Devenport
Loving Grace by Erica L. Satifka
The Petals Abide by Benjanun Sriduangkaew
Mrs. Griffin Prepares to Commit Suicide Tonight by A Que
For the Love of Sylvia City by Andrea M. Pawley
Somewhere I Have Never Traveled (Third Sound Remix) by E. Catherine Tobler
Asymptotic by Andy Dudak
Snakes by Yoon Ha Lee
It Was Educational by J.B. Park
This Wanderer, in the Dark of the Year by Kris Millering
Forestspirit, Forestspirit by Bogi Takács
The Hunger Tower by Pan Haitian
The Algebra of Events by Elizabeth Bourne
Android Whores Can’t Cry by Natalia Theodoridou
Let Baser Things Devise by Berrien C. Henderson
Security Check by Han Song
Ossuary by Ian Muneshwar
The Servant by Emily Devenport
An Evolutionary Myth by Bo-young Kim
Further North by Kay Chronister
Cremulator by Robert Reed
The Occidental Bride by Benjanun Sriduangkaew
Preserve Her Memory by Bao Shu
The Garden Beyond Her Infinite Skies by Matthew Kressel
When Your Child Strays From God by Sam J. Miller
Today I Am Paul by Martin L. Shoemaker
About the Authors
Clarkesworld Census
About Clarkesworld

Order the Trade Paperback From:

Amazon
Wyrm Publishing

Order the Ebook Edition From:

Amazon.com (Kindle/Mobi)
Apple (epub)
B&N (epub)
Kobo (epub)
Wyrm Publishing (epub/Mobi)

Copies will also be available at the Clarkesworld table at Readercon this month.

Why Clarkesworld is no longer available on Magzter

For some time now, I have been trying to track down the source of pirated copies of Clarkesworld that would appear moments after subscriptions were filled. After some time, I was able to narrow the problem down to issues distributed through Magzter. On one occasion, I found a pirated copy after only two of their customers had downloaded that month’s issue. I emailed support and asked for assistance in identifying the source (providing the details I had discovered–times, customer numbers) and was ignored. (They don’t share subscriber information with publishers.) I emailed then again on two separate occasions–one directly to someone who had emailed me first–, but neither of those were responded to either.

Finally, at the end of May, I gave up on them. The best way to solve the problem was to cut them off. I logged into my account and discovered that there were no options to remove a publication or back issues from their site. I then emailed them the following:

Hi,
After failing to receive responses to multiple complaints about your platform being the source of pirated copies of our magazine, we have decided to terminate our relationship with Magzter and remove our publication from your site.
It appears as though you have made it difficult to do this, so please provide instructions by which we can do so, or remove them yourself and inform us when the process has been completed.
Thank you,
-Neil

THAT got their attention. Within three hours I had the following reply (which was also copied to several other people in the company):

Dear Neil,
Could you send us the URL.
We have all of the piracy issues fixed already and we don’t find any new magazines getting pirated.

Aside from the signature, that’s all there was to the reply.

As an aside, let me direct your attention to their publisher terms and conditions (www.magzter.com/publisher/terms), specifically this part of section 3.4.2:

Provided that in the event Magzter learns of any such piracy, Magzter shall inform the Publisher thereof and provide the Publisher with details thereof (to the extent such details are known to and available to Magzter).

The above email basically admits that they knew there were problems, were silently dealing with them in the background, and going by all  the emails I’ve received from them over the years, never telling publishers about it, despite the promise to do so.

My response:

You seem to think I was merely threatening to leave Magzter over this. You’ve already missed the opportunity to fix it. Please just answer my question and tell me how to withdraw our magazine and back issues from your site. That will solve my problem.

and theirs…

Dear Neil,
Sure, I shall assist on the removal process.
But I would request you to share us the link since our firewalls have been strengthened and there is no such issue as of now.
Since you have been our prestigious client we dont want to miss you.

This is interesting because it more or less says that their own poor security was to blame for at least some of the piracy. I can say it didn’t solve the problem as I had just finished filing the latest batch of DMCA complaints for copies I know came from their site.

We went back and forth with them one more time asking for links/files but not doing what I had asked them to. Frustrated, I told them they were only making the situation worse by dragging it out. They finally relented and said they’d end subscriptions. I had to remind them again that I had asked them to terminate all back issue sales as well. (It wasn’t part of the instructions to another employee that I was copied on.)

Twelve days later the subscriptions and back issues were still available for sale, so they got another email. They replied “This will be removed very soon and surely will update you on Monday EOD.”

Late Tuesday, it is still available for sale and there has been no update. I email them again and get an excuse that they had been on emergency leave. That explains the lack of email–at best, assuming I believe anything they say now–but not the lack of action by the other employees who had been told to carry out the action.

They finally remove the magazine the next day.

Three days later, I do another check of their site and find articles from some of our issues are available on their site for free. Another email. Another apology. Finally, we are free.

I know we’ll never eliminate piracy, but it was rampant while we were working with them. The number of DMCA complaints I’ve had to make this month–the first month away from them–is down 90%. That says something.

If you were one of the few people subscribing to Clarkesworld on Magzter, my apologies, but this had to be done. There are many other places you can subscribe that don’t cause problems for their publishers and I hope you’ll consider subscribing through one of them instead.

If you’re a publisher, I’m posting this in part for you too. Obviously they’ve had security problems and haven’t been communicating. You deserve to know.

2018 Hugo Award Finalists

The 2018 Hugo Award Finalists have been announced!

So very honored to be a finalist for Best Editor Short Form again this year. This is my sixth nomination in this category–no wins–and every time has been as much a thrill as the others. Always and amazing group of colleagues competing in this category.

Also very happy to see “The Secret Life of Bots,” by Suzanne Palmer (Clarkesworld, September 2017) and “A Series of Steaks,” by Vina Jie-Min Prasad (Clarkesworld, January 2017) competing for the Hugo Award for Best Novelette and  Vina among the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer finalists. I included both of these stories in my latest Best Science Fiction of the Year anthology–and Vina as best new writer–so it’s nice to see others agreeing with me.

A big thank you to all the people who nominated this year. I appreciate your support and hope to see some of you at Worldcon this summer!

Clarkesworld Year Nine

The latest in our Clarkesworld anthology series will be published on April 1st. Clarkesworld Year Nine: Volume One, marks the first time one of our annuals has had to be split in two. Ebook editions are now available for preorder from Amazon, Apple, B&N, and Kobo. At the moment, the trade paperback is available in preorder from Wyrm Publishing. Amazon will have it available starting on the 1st.

The second volume is already in production and I hope to have a release date for that soon. This set is long overdue, so you can expect the Year Ten anthologies to follow it fairly quickly.

Hard Sells

Over at Clarkesworld, our submission guidelines provide a list of stories that are very difficult for an author to sell us. The list has evolved over the years, but we haven’t had to add many in recent years. That said, we still receive a lot of submissions from authors that have either not read the guidelines or think their story will be the exception. (Stares directly at the authors submitting stories about zombies. You’re wrong.)

For years, we’ve received stories that have attempted to violate every one of those hard sell criteria. My own sons–under pseudonyms–have even written and submitted them. I can see how the combination might make for an interesting writing challenge, but I can’t imagine the finished product ever selling. I suspect the authors know this as well and are submitting them more out of the humor value than any hope of publication. Still, it seems I should be more up-front about that…

I just added it to the list.