Clarkesworld Receives Grant to Publishing Korean Science Fiction

In May 2015, Clarkesworld published “An Evolutionary Myth” by Bo-Young Kim, translated from Korean by Gord Sellar and Jihyun Park. I am pleased to announce that Clarkesworld Magazine has now received a grant from the Literature Translation Institute of Korea (LTI Korea) to translate and publish nine more Korean science fiction stories in 2019.

The process for selection and translation of stories will be similar to the model developed for Clarkesworld‘s Chinese translation project, which has recently celebrated its fourth anniversary. In that model, a group of people serve as a recommendation team that will provide story notes and details to Neil Clarke for evaluation and selection. Stories will then be confirmed for English language availability, contracted, and assigned to one of several translators.

At present, our schedule calls for the first translation to published in our April issue, replacing a fiction slot currently occupied by a reprint. Stories are scheduled to appear monthly through the end of the year. If a translation is late–we’d rather it be right than rushed–two translations will run in the next available issue.

We are very grateful to LTI Korea for giving us this opportunity to publish more works in translation and look forward to working with a group of authors that is mostly new to English language audiences. I would also like to thank Alex Baek (LTI), YK Yoon (Korea SF Association), Gord Sellar, and Jihyun Park for their input and assistance on both this grant and the project itself.

The second volume for Clarkesworld Year Nine

NOW AVAILABLE!

Clarkesworld: Year Nine, Volume Two

Wyrm Publishing, July 1, 2018
ISBN: 978-1-64236-002-8 (trade paperback)
ISBN: 978-1-64236-001-1 (ebook)

Since 2006, Clarkesworld Magazine has been entertaining science fiction and fantasy fans with their brand of unique science fiction and fantasy stories. Collected here are all of the stories this Hugo Award-winning magazine published during the second half of their ninth year. Includes stories by Emily Devenport, Matthew Kressel, Yoon Ha Lee, Sam J. Miller, Robert Reed, Martin L. Shoemaker, Han Song, and many more!

CONTENTS

Introduction by Neil Clarke
The Empress in Her Glory by Robert Reed
Postcards From Monster Island by Emily Devenport
Loving Grace by Erica L. Satifka
The Petals Abide by Benjanun Sriduangkaew
Mrs. Griffin Prepares to Commit Suicide Tonight by A Que
For the Love of Sylvia City by Andrea M. Pawley
Somewhere I Have Never Traveled (Third Sound Remix) by E. Catherine Tobler
Asymptotic by Andy Dudak
Snakes by Yoon Ha Lee
It Was Educational by J.B. Park
This Wanderer, in the Dark of the Year by Kris Millering
Forestspirit, Forestspirit by Bogi Takács
The Hunger Tower by Pan Haitian
The Algebra of Events by Elizabeth Bourne
Android Whores Can’t Cry by Natalia Theodoridou
Let Baser Things Devise by Berrien C. Henderson
Security Check by Han Song
Ossuary by Ian Muneshwar
The Servant by Emily Devenport
An Evolutionary Myth by Bo-young Kim
Further North by Kay Chronister
Cremulator by Robert Reed
The Occidental Bride by Benjanun Sriduangkaew
Preserve Her Memory by Bao Shu
The Garden Beyond Her Infinite Skies by Matthew Kressel
When Your Child Strays From God by Sam J. Miller
Today I Am Paul by Martin L. Shoemaker
About the Authors
Clarkesworld Census
About Clarkesworld

Order the Trade Paperback From:

Amazon
Wyrm Publishing

Order the Ebook Edition From:

Amazon.com (Kindle/Mobi)
Apple (epub)
B&N (epub)
Kobo (epub)
Wyrm Publishing (epub/Mobi)

Copies will also be available at the Clarkesworld table at Readercon this month.

Why Clarkesworld is no longer available on Magzter

For some time now, I have been trying to track down the source of pirated copies of Clarkesworld that would appear moments after subscriptions were filled. After some time, I was able to narrow the problem down to issues distributed through Magzter. On one occasion, I found a pirated copy after only two of their customers had downloaded that month’s issue. I emailed support and asked for assistance in identifying the source (providing the details I had discovered–times, customer numbers) and was ignored. (They don’t share subscriber information with publishers.) I emailed then again on two separate occasions–one directly to someone who had emailed me first–, but neither of those were responded to either.

Finally, at the end of May, I gave up on them. The best way to solve the problem was to cut them off. I logged into my account and discovered that there were no options to remove a publication or back issues from their site. I then emailed them the following:

Hi,
After failing to receive responses to multiple complaints about your platform being the source of pirated copies of our magazine, we have decided to terminate our relationship with Magzter and remove our publication from your site.
It appears as though you have made it difficult to do this, so please provide instructions by which we can do so, or remove them yourself and inform us when the process has been completed.
Thank you,
-Neil

THAT got their attention. Within three hours I had the following reply (which was also copied to several other people in the company):

Dear Neil,
Could you send us the URL.
We have all of the piracy issues fixed already and we don’t find any new magazines getting pirated.

Aside from the signature, that’s all there was to the reply.

As an aside, let me direct your attention to their publisher terms and conditions (www.magzter.com/publisher/terms), specifically this part of section 3.4.2:

Provided that in the event Magzter learns of any such piracy, Magzter shall inform the Publisher thereof and provide the Publisher with details thereof (to the extent such details are known to and available to Magzter).

The above email basically admits that they knew there were problems, were silently dealing with them in the background, and going by all  the emails I’ve received from them over the years, never telling publishers about it, despite the promise to do so.

My response:

You seem to think I was merely threatening to leave Magzter over this. You’ve already missed the opportunity to fix it. Please just answer my question and tell me how to withdraw our magazine and back issues from your site. That will solve my problem.

and theirs…

Dear Neil,
Sure, I shall assist on the removal process.
But I would request you to share us the link since our firewalls have been strengthened and there is no such issue as of now.
Since you have been our prestigious client we dont want to miss you.

This is interesting because it more or less says that their own poor security was to blame for at least some of the piracy. I can say it didn’t solve the problem as I had just finished filing the latest batch of DMCA complaints for copies I know came from their site.

We went back and forth with them one more time asking for links/files but not doing what I had asked them to. Frustrated, I told them they were only making the situation worse by dragging it out. They finally relented and said they’d end subscriptions. I had to remind them again that I had asked them to terminate all back issue sales as well. (It wasn’t part of the instructions to another employee that I was copied on.)

Twelve days later the subscriptions and back issues were still available for sale, so they got another email. They replied “This will be removed very soon and surely will update you on Monday EOD.”

Late Tuesday, it is still available for sale and there has been no update. I email them again and get an excuse that they had been on emergency leave. That explains the lack of email–at best, assuming I believe anything they say now–but not the lack of action by the other employees who had been told to carry out the action.

They finally remove the magazine the next day.

Three days later, I do another check of their site and find articles from some of our issues are available on their site for free. Another email. Another apology. Finally, we are free.

I know we’ll never eliminate piracy, but it was rampant while we were working with them. The number of DMCA complaints I’ve had to make this month–the first month away from them–is down 90%. That says something.

If you were one of the few people subscribing to Clarkesworld on Magzter, my apologies, but this had to be done. There are many other places you can subscribe that don’t cause problems for their publishers and I hope you’ll consider subscribing through one of them instead.

If you’re a publisher, I’m posting this in part for you too. Obviously they’ve had security problems and haven’t been communicating. You deserve to know.