Award-Winning Editor of Clarkesworld Magazine, Forever Magazine, The Best Science Fiction of the Year, and More

Category: awards Page 1 of 10

2020 Hugo Finalist for Best Editor (Short Form)

 
The 2020 Hugo Award finalists were announced yesterday and I am deeply honored to once again be a finalist for Best Editor Short Form. (This is the eighth time. No wins so far.)

Like many conventions, however, Worldcon (New Zealand) has had to make the difficult decision to cancel their physical convention and replace it with an online convention and award ceremony. This will be the first virtual Worldcon and Hugo Award Ceremony and I’m looking forward to taking part in all they offer. I encourage you to do so too.

Being a finalist this year has been a source of some amusement for me. My career in publishing started online with Clarkesworld and it has occupied a dominate portion of the work I’ve done over the last fourteen years. I find novelty in the fact that there’s a chance that my first win could happen during the first digital Hugo Award ceremony. Somewhat poetic even. Win or lose, however, it’s a wonderful thing to be a part of, particularly after the last six months.

I’d also like to congratulate to my fellow short form finalists: Ellen Datlow, C.C. Finlay, Jonathan Strahan, Lynne M. Thomas & Michael Damian Thomas, and Sheila Williams. Quite a fine club to be a part of, don’t you think?

Congratulations Nebula Finalists!

 
Congratulations to all of this year’s finalists for the Nebula Award and in particular, A. T. Greenblatt. “Give the Family My Love” (from the February 2019 issue of Clarkesworld) is a finalist for best short story!

Read: clarkesworldmagazine.com/greenblatt_02_19
Listen: clarkesworldmagazine.com/audio_02_19c 

Worldcon Schedule – Dublin2019

I’ll be at the Dublin Worldcon later this month. Here’s the program items I’ll be involved in:

Short fiction of 2018
16 Aug 2019, Friday 10:00 – 10:50, Wicklow Room-3 (CCD)
Alasdair Stuart (M), Jonathan Strahan, Sheila Williams, Neil Clarke

What makes a good short story? Can we find any similarities in the themes of recent short stories? Join our panel of editors for a rundown of the short fiction published in 2018, including the Hugo Award finalists for Best Short Story and the James White Award.

Bridging the language barrier: translated SFF
16 Aug 2019, Friday 12:00 – 12:50, Wicklow Hall-1 (CCD)
Cheryl Morgan (M), Julie Novakova, Neil Clarke, Francesco Verso, Emily Xueni Jin

How has the landscape of translated SFF changed in the last decade or so, both into English and from English into other languages? We’ve seen translated pieces triumph in the genre’s prime awards and gain dedicated magazines, the attention of more readers, and many specialised anthologies. The panel will discuss trends in translated genre fiction as well as possible future directions.

Pitch perfect
16 Aug 2019, Friday 14:00 – 14:50, Wicklow Room-3 (CCD)
Julie Crisp, Bella Pagan, Anne Perry, Navah Wolfe, Neil Clarke

Pitching a story can be intimidating, especially if you’re new to the field or are changing agents/editors. This is your chance to find out what agents, editors, and publishers want from their current writers, from writers fresh to the market, and from writers transitioning to someone new. Hear from the pros about what – and what not – to do when preparing the perfect pitch. (If there even is such a thing…)

Autographs
17 Aug 2019, Saturday 15:00 – 15:50, Level 4 Foyer (CCD)
Darcie Little Badger, Corinne Duyvis, Stark Holborn, Neil Clarke, Michael Swanwick

Kaffeeklatsch: Neil Clarke
18 Aug 2019, Sunday 14:00 – 14:50, Level 3 Foyer (KK/LB) (CCD)

Hugo Award Ceremony
18 Aug 2019, Sunday 20:00-22:00, Auditorium (CCD)

Hugo Proposal for Best Translated Novel

For several years now, I’ve been involved in publishing and promoting translated science fiction. If you haven’t heard, there’s now a proposal to create a Hugo Award for Best Translated Novel. (The only place I’ve seen it mentioned is here: http://file770.com/best-translated-novel-hugo-category-proposed/)

The biggest problem I have with this proposal is the message it sends not only to domestic readers, but foreign authors, editors, and publishers: translated works are not as good as ours, so we’re making a special category for you so you can get awards too. I don’t believe that’s the intention of those who drafted this proposal. I think they approached it with the best of intentions, but simply got it wrong. For years now, I have been making the case that we should be treating translated and international works as equals: stories worthy of standing alongside those we have routinely seen published. This proposal sends the opposite message, and on those grounds intend to vote no.

Translated works are capable of winning the Hugo without any special treatment. As they point out in their own commentary, three translated works have won since 2015, despite the relatively low number of translations published among a wide sea of domestic releases.

If the source of the perceived problem is that not enough people are reading translations to provide a fair opportunity at nomination, though, then I would suggest that a special Hugo is not the solution to the problem and that their predicament is not unique. The same argument can be made for a wide array of self-published, small press, or even limited edition works.

I’ll counter their Wollheim quote with one by Lester Del Rey:

“…our stories are set to large numbers of fans and translators all over the world, while our own authors and fans seldom get even a hint of the work being done in our field by others. We’re in serious danger of becoming the most provincial science-fiction readers—and writers—on earth.” (International Science-Fiction, June 1968.)

That prediction came to pass and those three Hugos—among other things—are demonstrating that we might actually be waking up from that long provincial nap. The stigma of translations is starting to fade and more publishers are beginning to invest in these efforts. That said, there’s still a mountain of progress to be made with the wider community of readers, editors, and publishers. That’s a marketing problem and not one to solve with a Hugo.

I’m also concerned by the decision to specifically single out novels, when translations are possible across all categories. The proposal even draws comparison to the Academy Award’s “Best Foreign Film,” which it could have just as easily argued as a category for the Hugos, but didn’t. If the motivation was based on the body of work in a category, then surely the short fiction categories would have been more worthy of consideration as the greatest variety of translated science fiction and fantasy can be found there. If the selection of novel is based on the prestige of the category, then they are suggesting one of lesser prestige for those works to compete in.

Others might justify the category by saying that many non-Anglophone countries also include special awards for translated works—often in multiple categories. That, however, is often born of circumstances not applicable here. Anglophone SF is something of an invasive species in many markets. Our translated works can saturate a field, sometimes representing more than 50% of the novels published in a year. As a result, these awards have segregated in a way that allows their local communities to flourish. It’s a matter of pride to celebrate one’s own local community, particularly when another’s community dominates—even if it’s only a perception of quality. The inverse is not true. Breaking off translated works on their own reinforces the negative perception that anglophone SF is the king of the hill and that they aren’t welcome or as worthy. Every time a translated work wins, it helps shatter that illusion. Please don’t take that away. 

[Side note: In short fiction, we have a several decades long history of well-meaning people trying to increase the audience for translated works in our field. Often this has been done by bundling translations together and setting them aside from domestic works. People who have an existing bias against translated works–or even foreign films–aren’t going to engage with narrowly-focused efforts. It’s simply preaching to the choir. This category would continue down that path.]

2019 Chesley Award Winners

The Chesley Awards were presented tonight at Spikecon (aka Westercon 72, NASFiC 2019,1632 Minicon, and Manticon 2019). I wish I could have found a way to make the trip out to Utah to attend, but it just wasn’t in the cards.

The good news is that Arthur Haas won the Chesley for Best Magazine Cover for Clarkesworld issue #140:

and I won the Chesley Award for Best Art Director! What a night!

A big thank you goes to all the members of ASFA for this honor. Congratulations to all the other winners (and finalists) as well. A full list can be found on ASFA’s Facebook page.

2019 Chesley Award Finalists

The 2019 Chesley Award Finalists have been announced and I am very pleased to see Clarkesworld artists Sean Andrew Murray (“The Storkfriars”) and Arthur Haas (“Meeting”) on the ballot for Best Magazine Illustration.

I am also very honored to be a finalist for Best Art Director.

Thank you ASFA and congratulations to all the finalists!

Page 1 of 10

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén