Best of 2017 anthologies: Where the stories come from

Gardner Dozois, Jonathan Strahan, Rich Horton, and I edit year’s best anthologies. Here’s the top ten sources for the 2017 stories we included.

These ten markets represent 70.6% of all year’s best appearances. Individually, they have:

Asimov’s 11.9%
Clarkesworld 11.1%
Tor.com 10.3%
F&SF 7.9%
Analog 5.6%
Infinity Wars 5.6%
Lightspeed 5.6%
Extrasolar 4.8%
Cosmic Powers 4.0%
Uncanny 4.0%

Which format has the upper-hand?

Best Science Fiction of the Year: Volume 3 – ToC and Cover reveal

The Best Science Fiction of the Year – Volume 3

Night Shade Books – April 3, 2018
ISBN-10: 1597809365
ISBN-13: 978-1597809368

The third volume in a new year’s best series. This book will feature science fiction short stories/novelettes/novellas originally published in 2017.

Available at:

Table of Contents

  • “A Series of Steaks” by Vina Jie-Min Prasad (Clarkesworld, January 2017)
  • “Holdfast” by Alastair Reynolds (Extrasolar, edited by Nick Gevers)
  • “Every Hour of Light and Dark” by Nancy Kress (Omni, Winter 2017)
  • “The Last Novelist, or a Dead Lizard in the Yard” by Matthew Kressel (Tor.com, March 2017)
  • “Shikasta” by Vandana Singh (Visions, Ventures, Escape Velocities, edited by Ed Finn and Joey Eschrich)
  • “Wind Will Rove” by Sarah Pinsker (Asimov’s Science Fiction, September/October 2017)
  • “Focus” by Gord Sellar (Analog Science Fiction and Fact, May/June 2017)
  • “The Martian Obelisk” by Linda Nagata (Tor.com, July 2017)
  • “Shadows of Eternity” by Gregory Benford (Extrasolar, edited by Nick Gevers)
  • “The Worldless” by Indrapramit Das (Lightspeed, March 2017)
  • “Regarding the Robot Raccoons Attached to the Hull of My Ship” by Rachael K. Jones and Khaalidah Muhammad-Ali (Diabolical Plots, June 2017)
  • “Belly Up” by Maggie Clark (Analog Science Fiction and Fact, July/August 2017)
  • “Uncanny Valley” by Greg Egan (Tor.com, August 2017)
  • “We Who Live in the Heart ” by Kelly Robson (Clarkesworld, May 2017)
  • “A Catalogue of Sunlight at the End of the World” by A.C. Wise (Sunvault, edited by Phoebe Wagner and Bronte Christopher Wieland)
  • “Meridian” by Karin Lowachee (Where the Stars Rise, edited by Lucas K. Law and Derwin Mak)
  • “The Tale of the Alcubierre Horse” by Kathleen Ann Goonan (Extrasolar, edited by Nick Gevers)
  • “Extracurricular Activities” by Yoon Ha Lee (Tor.com, February 2017)
  • “In Everlasting Wisdom” by Aliette de Bodard (Infinity Wars, edited by Jonathan Strahan)
  • “The Last Boat-Builder in Ballyvoloon” by Finbarr O’Reilly (Clarkesworld, October 2017)
  • “The Speed of Belief” by Robert Reed (Asimov’s Science Fiction, January/February 2017)
  • “Death on Mars” by Madeline Ashby (Visions, Ventures, Escape Velocities, edited by Ed Finn and Joey Eschrich)
  • “An Evening with Severyn Grimes” by Rich Larson (Asimov’s Science Fiction, July/August 2017)
  • “ZeroS” by Peter Watts (Infinity Wars, edited by Jonathan Strahan)
  • “The Secret Life of Bots” by Suzanne Palmer (Clarkesworld, September 2017)
  • “Zen and the Art of Starship Maintenance” by Tobias S. Buckell (Cosmic Powers, edited by John Joseph Adams)

Cover art by Chris McGrath.

The Final Frontier – Cover and ToC reveal

THE FINAL FRONTIER

Night Shade Books – July 3, 2018
ISBN-10: 159780939X
ISBN-13: 978-1597809399

The urge to explore and discover is a natural and universal one, and the edge of the unknown is expanded with each passing year as scientific advancements inch us closer and closer to the outer reaches of our solar system and the galaxies beyond them.

Generations of writers have explored these new frontiers and the endless possibilities they present in great detail. With galaxy-spanning adventures of discovery and adventure, from generations ships to warp drives, exploring new worlds to first contacts, science fiction writers have given readers increasingly new and alien ways to look out into our broad and sprawling universe.

The Final Frontier delivers stories from across this literary spectrum, a reminder that the universe is far large and brimming with possibilities than we could ever imagine, as hard as we may try.

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Available from:

Table of Contents

  • “A Jar of Goodwill” by Tobias S. Buckell (Clarkesworld, May 2010)
  • “Mono no aware” by Ken Liu (The Future is Japanese, edited by Nick Mamatas and Masumi Washington)
  • “Rescue Mission” by Jack Skillingstead (The Solaris Book of New Science Fiction, Volume 3, edited by George Mann)
  • “Shiva in Shadow ” by Nancy Kress (Between Worlds, edited by Robert Silverberg)
  • “Slow Life” by Michael Swanwick (Analog, December 2002)
  • “Three Bodies at Mitanni” by Seth Dickinson (Analog, June 2015)
  • “The Deeps of the Sky” by Elizabeth Bear (Edge of Infinity, edited by Jonathan Strahan)
  • “Diving into the Wreck” by Kristine Kathryn Rusch (Asimov’s, December 2005)
  • “The Voyage Out” by Gwyneth Jones (Periphery: Erotic Lesbian Futures, edited by Lynne Jamneck)
  • “The Symphony of Ice and Dust” by Julie Novakova (Clarkesworld, October 2013)
  • “Twenty Lights to “The Land of Snow”” by Michael Bishop (Going Interstellar, edited by Les Johnson and Jack McDevitt)
  • “The Firewall and the Door” by Sean McMullen (Analog, March 2013)
  • “Permanent Fatal Errors” by Jay Lake (Is Anybody Out There? edited by Nick Gevers and Marty Halpern )
  • “Gypsy” by Carter Scholz (PM Press, November 2015)
  • “Sailing the Antarsa” by Vandana Singh (The Other Half of the Sky, edited by Athena Andreadis)
  • “The Mind is Its Own Place” by Carrie Vaughn, LLC (Asimov’s, September 2016)
  • “The Wreck of the Godspeed” by James Patrick Kelly (Between Worlds, edited by Robert Silverberg)
  • “Seeing” by Genevieve Valentine (Clarkesworld, November 2010)
  • “Travelling into Nothing” by An Owomoyela (Bridging Infinity, edited by Jonathan Strahan)
  • “Glory” by Greg Egan (New Space Opera, edited by Jonathan Strahan and Gardner Dozois)
  • “The Island” by Peter Watts (New Space Opera 2, edited by Jonathan Strahan and Gardner Dozois)

Cover art by Fred Gambino.

Not One of Us – Call for submissions

I’m currently working on NOT ONE OF US, a reprint anthology focusing on the theme of aliens on Earth. I would like to see stories about alien invaders, refugees, colonists, observers, and more.

Publisher: Night Shade Books
Formats: Ebook, Print, and Audio
Publication Date: November 6, 2018
Payment: 1 cent/word against a pro-rata share of royalties
Submissions Window: Submissions will be open today through February 5th, 2018.

WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING FOR?

  • Science fiction reprints (no original stories) published within the last 20 years
  • 3000-22000 words in length
  • English language (translations are welcome)
  • Stories must take place on Earth and include aliens

HOW SHOULD YOU LET ME KNOW ABOUT A STORY?

If you are an editor or fan and would like to recommend a story for consideration, please leave a comment on this post or send email to neil@clarkesworldmagazine.com.

If you’re an author and have a story you would like considered for this anthology, please submit a copy in .doc or .rtf format at: http://clarkesworldmagazine.com/anthology/

Multiple submissions permitted.

Out Today! More Human than Human

Out today! My latest anthology from Night Shade Books:

MORE HUMAN THAN HUMAN
ISBN-10: 1597809144
ISBN-13: 978-1597809146

The idea of creating an artificial human is an old one. One of the earliest science-fictional novels, Frankenstein, concerned itself primarily with the hubris of creation, and one’s relationship to one’s creator. Later versions of this “artificial human” story (and indeed later adaptations of Frankenstein) changed the focus to more modernist questions… What is the nature of humanity? What does it mean to be human? These stories continued through the golden age of science fiction with Isaac Asimov’s I Robot story cycle, and then through post-modern iterations from new wave writers like Philip K. Dick. Today, this compelling science fiction trope persists in mass media narratives like Westworld and Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner, as well as twenty-first century science fiction novels like Charles Stross’s Saturn’s Children and Paolo Bacigalupi’s The Windup Girl. The short stories in More Human than Human demonstrate the depth and breadth of artificial humanity in contemporary science fiction. Issues of passing . . . of what it is to be human . . . of autonomy and slavery and oppression, and yes, the hubris of creation; these ideas have fascinated us for at least two hundred years, and this selection of stories demonstrates why it is such an alluring and recurring conceit.

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Table of Contents

  • “Dolly” by Elizabeth Bear
  • “A Good Home” by Karin Lowachee
  • “The Djinn’s Wife” by Ian McDonald
  • “And The Ends of The Earth For Thy Possession” by Robert B. Finegold
  • “Patterns of a Murmuration, in Billions of Data Points” by JY Yang
  • “The Birds and the Bees and the Gasoline Trees” by John Barnes
  • “Fixing Hanover” by Jeff VanderMeer
  • “Grand Jeté (The Great Leap)” by Rachel Swirsky
  • “Brisk Money” by Adam Christopher
  • “Act of Faith” by Fadzlishah Johanabas
  • “The Caretaker” by Ken Liu
  • “Seven Sexy Cowboy Robots” by Sandra McDonald
  • “We, Robots” by Sue Lange
  • “The Education of Junior Number 12” by Madeline Ashby
  • “A Hundred Ghosts Parade Tonight” by Xia Jia
  • “The Man” by Paul McAuley
  • “The Robot’s Girl” by Brenda Cooper
  • “.identity” by E. Catherine Tobler
  • “American Cheetah” by Robert Reed
  • “Artifice” by Naomi Kritzer
  • “Small Medicine” by Genevieve Valentine
  • “Silently and Very Fast” by Catherynne M. Valente
  • “I, Robot” by Cory Doctorow
  • “Bit Rot” by Charles Stross
  • “Angels of Ashes” by Alastair Reynolds
  • “The Old Dispensation” by Lavie Tidhar
  • “Today I am Paul” by Martin L. Shoemaker

Cover Art by Donato Giancola.